|||
Manny's Story
Pismo Beach, CA
I've always worked, but right now we must wait for low-income housing to finally have a home. The...
Read more
Manny's Story
Pismo Beach, CA

You can make a difference. Give today.

Share Your Story See More Stories
Jamie's Story
El Paso, TX
I served in the U.S. Navy for 10 years.My local food pantry helped my family with food and also...
Read more
Jamie's Story
El Paso, TX

You can make a difference. Give today.

Share Your Story See More Stories
For Better Not Worse
FOR BETTER NOT WORSE'S Story
Bringing Bags of Groceries to Children Facing Hunger
Read more
For Better Not Worse
FOR BETTER NOT WORSE'S Story

The statistics on child hunger in the U.S. continue to exist — that in itself is a problem. More than 1 in 5 children in the U.S. are at risk of hunger; among African-American and Latino children, this statistic jumps to 1 in 4. These statistics are real children that are suffering from real problems, and they need real solutions.

FOR BETTER NOT WORSE (FBNW) is a Los Angeles based apparel company that is making a positive impact on child food insecurity. For each item that FBNW sells, we give a bag of groceries to a child in need in the U.S., which we personally distribute during our monthly at FBNW Food Drop events. The Food Drops allow us to meet and get to know the children and families that we directly impact.

The children that show up for the FBNW Food Drops are generally younger and unaware that their families are struggling to feed them. They run around playfully with their bags of groceries while our team chats with their parents to gain a better understanding of their current situation, and how we as a company can do more to help. The stories range from heartbreaking to full-on tear inducing.

We once met a family of 13 who for the last few months were living in a van. The family that consisted of three teens, three tweens, and five elementary-age children were facing hard times to say the least. Their father told us that they were struggling to make ends meet, rent was not being paid, and eventually the family was evicted from their apartment. Living in their van and not paying rent allowed them to put more money towards food. But he was worried that the food was not enough, and that he was putting his family’s health at risk by feeding them cheap fast food, which was all they could afford.

Separately, a single mother of four children shared with us that the stress of figuring out where her children’s next meals would come from was taking a toll on her personal health. Because of her limited ability to speak English, she found it difficult to discover all the programs that are in place to help her family. She worried that one day she may have a heart attack or stroke from stress and said, “What will happen to my children?”

The most heartbreaking of all is hearing stories of parents crying at night after sending their children to bed hungry. These parents feel ashamed, hopeless and defeated. Sadly, it was a story we heard many times.

Children from food insecure households are at a higher risk of developing health conditions ranging from hypertension, diabetes, and other chronic illnesses that stick throughout adulthood. Beyond providing the nutrients necessary for developing bodies, having access to food will increase a child’s likelihood of staying in school. Three out of four teachers say their students regularly show up to school hungry. These children find it hard to focus in class, which results in poor grades and falling behind. The further they fall behind, the more difficulties will arise for them in social situations. Being “hangry” is just one emotion that these children experience; sad, embarrassed, worried, and confused are more debilitating emotions that children from food insecure households experience.

Luckily there are millions of people who care about child hunger and are doing something about it. FBNW is doing its part as a young company to make an impact. On average, we feed 200-300 children at our monthly FBNW Food Drops, with a goal to feed thousands of children every week across the U.S.

Throughout September — Hunger Action Month — FBNW will be volunteering to lend our support to help raise awareness to the issue. We held our September FBNW Food Drop with our partners at the Boys & Girls Club Pasadena which also coincided with our first annual #DayWithoutFood. We went without food for 24 hours on September 1st and urged others to join us to help raise awareness about the hunger issue in the U.S. In exchange for their efforts, we will be giving a bag of groceries to a child in need for each person who participated in our #DayWithoutFood.

We encourage everyone to participate in Hunger Action Month in your own way. Volunteer, spread the word during September and beyond in hopes that together, we can one day put child hunger statistics to bed.

For Better Not Worse

Fiona Chan holds the position of Difference Maker/Marketing at For Better Not Worse.

You can make a difference. Give today.

Share Your Story See More Stories
David Brearton
David Brearton's Story
Now retired from his 30-year career in finance David continues to support hunger relief through...
Read more
David Brearton
David Brearton's Story

Looking back at Feeding America’s impressive growth during his eight-year tenure on our board of directors — the number of pounds provided to people struggling with hunger nearly doubled between 2006 and 2014 — few would believe that David Brearton had once been “new to the cause of hunger.” Working for Kraft Foods and having just relocated to Chicago, the Canada native’s only stipulation to board participation was that his efforts would help people in need. A thorough education in U.S. hunger soon followed. “Hats off to Kate Maehr, Executive Director and CEO of the Greater Chicago Food Depository,” said David, “who showed me her food bank, food agencies and areas in her region. That was the opening of ‘hunger.’ ” The biggest surprise about hunger in America? “How common it was,” said David, “Even back then the numbers were staggering.”

Reflecting on his board service, David was most excited by the Feeding America network of food banks’ innovative efforts to meet the growing demand and provide more food, from 2 billion pounds in 2006 to nearly 4 billion pounds by 2014. And of his board counterparts he is proud that they “were truly interested in people in need.” He continued, “Many members moved on and off the board, but they were 100% focused on helping the people we served.”

David’s work in hunger relief brought him in contact with a wide array of individuals, including Feeding America and food bank staff, volunteers, people in need and other board members. He commented, “All Feeding America CEOs are impressive people. They are incredibly passionate and dedicated to the individuals they serve.” One stands out in his mind: Of former board member Jan Pruitt, he said, “Jan was a classic CEO. Nothing was artificial. She dedicated her life to hunger relief and led a progressive food bank. If any need arose, she would meet that need in any way possible.”

Looking ahead, David is optimistic about the future of hunger relief, citing Feeding America’s successful efforts to secure more produce and rescue more food from restaurants and related channels. In bringing awareness to the issue of hunger, David said Feeding America “communicates people’s stories and brings hunger to life. We are telling the story better and are helping the nation understand that hunger is real, that these are real people.”

Now retired from his 30-year career in finance, culminating in the CFO position at Mondelēz International and Kraft Foods, David continues to support hunger relief through financial donations and his role as co-chair of Feeding America’s emeritus board of directors. Feeding America is incredibly grateful for David’s board service, his commitment to hunger relief and his strong leadership during key organizational transitions including the name change from America’s Second Harvest-The Nation’s Food Bank Network to Feeding America in 2008.

You can make a difference. Give today.

Share Your Story See More Stories
Andrea Crowder
Andrea Crowder's Story
Miami, FL
As part of the business plan at Andrea Crowder Fitness, the organization supports charities that...
Read more
Andrea Crowder
Andrea Crowder's Story
Miami, FL

The request arrived with seemingly divine timing. An invitation to a “Farm to Table” event for the Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona, a member of the Feeding America network, was an answer to a prayer for Andrea Crowder, who wanted to feel more connected to her giving. She marked her calendar and, when the day came, attended the event with her young daughter.

Andrea, a life coach with a message of freedom and flexibility, wants to be a force for good. As part of the business plan at Andrea Crowder Fitness, the organization supports charities that make a difference, including Feeding America.

Already a donor to Feeding America, Andrea chose to “step it up” after hearing Tony Robbins talk about his experience with childhood hunger, his partnership with Feeding America and his support of individuals facing hunger. His story resonated with Andrea’s own early years when the kindness of strangers helped soothe difficult family circumstances. To date, Andrea’s donations to Feeding America have equated to over 100,000 meals for people struggling with hunger.

We asked Andrea how it feels to give back. “If I had to say one word, it would be ‘empowered,’” she said. “I feel empowered when I can help someone. I know how defeating it feels to depend on other people. How humbled and desperate you feel when you get to that point. I know how hard that is.”

Now on the giving end, Andrea reflected on her experience at the food bank event. “I did not realize that the issue of hunger and Feeding America’s work go well beyond a meal. Feeding America helps put people up on their feet,” she said. “I was surprised to hear that you partner with other organizations to help people who fall on hard times.” She continued, “It was so nice to shake hands with the people who work to end hunger and see what is going on in the community. It gave me a bigger vision of hunger relief.”

It is a vision that Andrea wishes to instill in her children as well. With the belief that “even if you only have a little, you can give a little to others,” Andrea added, “You feel more fulfilled when you feel connected, when you know your actions have a bigger impact on others.”

On behalf of the 42 million people in the United States who struggle with hunger, we thank Andrea for her ongoing support of our work and for her vision of a hunger-free America.

You can make a difference. Give today.

Share Your Story See More Stories
|||
Items 1 - 5 of 68  12345678910Next
 

Stay Informed

Get email updates about what we're doing to help solve hunger and how you can help.